« Fishing justice in Yemen and the limits of grand design | Main | Opaque Transparency and Transparent Opacity, part 2 »

09/11/2013

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Pderenzio

Matt,

very interesting posts!
It's great to see people using OBI data in new and interesting ways.

I think you are pointing to very important issues, but having taken a look at the numbers, I'm not sure things are as straightforward as they seem. We tried to replicate your calculations of 'transparency gaps', but came up with different results. And there are other ways of looking at the data that might be more useful, like looking at how individual countries' openness across the different stages of the budget cycle changes over time.

On a more general level, I agree with you that it is important to use international indicators like the OBI so that they promote change that is relevant and important to citizens’ lives and government performance in each country context, rather than promote cosmetic improvements to a government’s international image. I also think that there’s a need to recognize that the struggle for transparency needs to be put in a much broader context where a variety of domestic factors and dynamics shape governments’ willingness to open up their books, and the degree to which transparency can in turn contribute to positive development outcomes.

We've posted a more comprehensive response here:
http://internationalbudget.org/do-african-governments-adopt-transparency-reforms-just-to-make-themselves-look-better-a-response-to-matt-andrews/

Let us know what you think!

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

MY BOOK OF THE WEEK....................
Rethinking productive development
Rethinking Productive Investment, by Crespi, Fernandez-Arias, and Stein... I really like this volume. It blends theory and practical cases about the challenges involved in making economic transformation processes work. It is also available free!
INTERESTED IN PDIA????????????????
Bsc
CHECK OUT THE MOZAMBIQUE EXPERIENCE ON THE BUILDING STATE CAPABILITY WEBSITE
Uganda
READ ABOUT PDIA IDEAS FOR UGANDA: Closing the gap between form and function: a new approach to institutional reform in Uganda
PAPERS I'M LOOKING AT WITH INTEREST
Healthy_roots2
Diagnosing Deep Roots of Development: Johannes W. Fedderke, Robert E. Klitgaard, James P. MacMurray, Valerio Napolioni
Slide1
"It is argued that in complex settings, performance management may benefit from new ways of carrying out performance management. It is suggested that performance management needs to be more agile, more decentralised and more political."
Slide1
Imran Rasul and Daniel Rogger looking at infrastructure projects in Nigeria: A really interesting paper...36% of announced projects never start...
MY RECENT BOOK
Limits book image
'is a landmark analysis that will change the way we both understand and design institutional reform.' Ha-Joon Chang, University of Cambridge, and author of 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism

Where you can order the book

MY RECENT PAPER ON GOVERNANCE AS ENDS AND MEANS
Governance ends and means
This paper synthesizes the approach I take to looking at governance in nations states. The approach emphasizes ends as the starting point for any view of governance. (Asking about what governments do rather than how they do them). I also emphasize means; but in thinking about what it takes to produce ends, not as stand-alone factors.
MY PAST WORLD BANK MONOGRAPH ON LEADERSHIP IN DEVELOPMENT
Devleadershipled
The paper explores what it takes to make change happen in the context of development, and in particular, the role leadership plays in bringing about change. The analysis and findings conclude that leadership manifests itself in different ways in different contexts, depending on readiness, factors that shape change, and leadership opportunities. However, the key characteristics of plurality, functionality, problem orientation, and change space creation are likely to be common to all successful leadership-led change events.
Tilley
A PAST MY BOOK OF THE WEEK: HELEN TILLEY...The Political Economy of Aid and Accountability. If you liked Ferguson's 'The Politics Machine' you should read Helen's book. Dynamic, deep, well researched and illuminating.
Moss_THE-GOLDEN-HOUR
PLUG OF THE WEEK: READ 'THE GOLDEN HOUR' BY TODD MOSS...SERIOUS, FUN, AND ENTERTAINING (YES, DEVELOPMENT CAN BE ALL THOSE THINGS)
My Photo